The Source of the Problem

The vast majority of funding for Wyoming public education comes from mineral taxes. Since our three major mining industries are currently in a downturn, they are providing significantly less tax revenue. That’s where the $250 million Education deficit comes from.

3 Reasons to Diversify Revenue streams

Using mineral taxes to fund public schools feels great during a boom—the people of Wyoming pay basically nothing for a really good education system. But the boom-and-bust nature of mining makes it a radically unstable funding source for something as crucial as education.

We should not Gamble with Education

It's not a student's fault that he grew up in a bust

While one generation of Wyoming children gets a well-rounded education from engaged and attentive teachers with plenty of resources, the next generation might be crammed into a crowded, understaffed classroom with instructors too overworked to offer anything but regurgitated standardized test questions.

we need new revenue streams

Economists say the current bust looks long, and that mining might never fully recover. Wyoming needs to change its tax structure so that the quality of public education in the state does not depend on the boom-and-bust mineral industries.

 

While one generation of Wyoming children gets a well-rounded education from engaged and attentive teachers with plenty of resources, the next generation might be crammed into a crowded, understaffed classroom with instructors too overworked to offer anything but regurgitated standardized test questions.
Economists say the current bust looks long, and that mining might never fully recover. Wyoming needs to change its tax structure so that the quality of public education in the state does not depend on the boom-and-bust mineral industries.
While one generation of Wyoming children gets a well-rounded education from engaged and attentive teachers with plenty of resources, the next generation might be crammed into a crowded, understaffed classroom with instructors too overworked to offer anything but regurgitated standardized test questions.
Economists say the current bust looks long, and that mining might never fully recover. Wyoming needs to change its tax structure so that the quality of public education in the state does not depend on the boom-and-bust mineral industries.
While one generation of Wyoming children gets a well-rounded education from engaged and attentive teachers with plenty of resources, the next generation might be crammed into a crowded, understaffed classroom with instructors too overworked to offer anything but regurgitated standardized test questions.
Economists say the current bust looks long, and that mining might never fully recover. Wyoming needs to change its tax structure so that the quality of public education in the state does not depend on the boom-and-bust mineral industries.
While one generation of Wyoming children gets a well-rounded education from engaged and attentive teachers with plenty of resources, the next generation might be crammed into a crowded, understaffed classroom with instructors too overworked to offer anything but regurgitated standardized test questions.
Economists say the current bust looks long, and that mining might never fully recover. Wyoming needs to change its tax structure so that the quality of public education in the state does not depend on the boom-and-bust mineral industries.
While one generation of Wyoming children gets a well-rounded education from engaged and attentive teachers with plenty of resources, the next generation might be crammed into a crowded, understaffed classroom with instructors too overworked to offer anything but regurgitated standardized test questions.
Economists say the current bust looks long, and that mining might never fully recover. Wyoming needs to change its tax structure so that the quality of public education in the state does not depend on the boom-and-bust mineral industries.
While one generation of Wyoming children gets a well-rounded education from engaged and attentive teachers with plenty of resources, the next generation might be crammed into a crowded, understaffed classroom with instructors too overworked to offer anything but regurgitated standardized test questions.

Economists say the current bust looks long, and that mining might never fully recover. Wyoming needs to change its tax structure so that the quality of public education in the state does not depend on the boom-and-bust mineral industries.

While one generation of Wyoming children gets a well-rounded education from engaged and attentive teachers with plenty of resources, the next generation might be crammed into a crowded, understaffed classroom with instructors too overworked to offer anything but regurgitated standardized test questions.

Economists say the current bust looks long, and that mining might never fully recover. Wyoming needs to change its tax structure so that the quality of public education in the state does not depend on the boom-and-bust mineral industries.
While one generation of Wyoming children gets a well-rounded education from engaged and attentive teachers with plenty of resources, the next generation might be crammed into a crowded, understaffed classroom with instructors too overworked to offer anything but regurgitated standardized test questions.
Economists say the current bust looks long, and that mining might never fully recover. Wyoming needs to change its tax structure so that the quality of public education in the state does not depend on the boom-and-bust mineral industries.