Organize a “house meeting” with your representative

Wyoming is a small town. You see your state legislators in restaurants, you know their cousins-in-law, your kids go to junior high together. Take advantage of this accessibility and invite your representative to meet with you and a couple of your like-minded friends. It’s harder for lawmakers to dismiss an argument in person.

Ways to take action

Speak at a Legislative committee meeting

Legislative committees meet throughout the state to discuss different topics. These meetings include opportunities for citizens to give public testimony. If you want to talk about education funding, attend a meeting of the Revenue Committee or the Select Committee on School Finance Recalibration. You can find out where and when these committees meet on the Legislature’s website (http://legisweb.state.wy.us) or sign up to receive emails at BetterWyo.org.

Make a phone call

Click here to find out your representatives' phone number. Prepare some notes before you call to ensure you clearly deliver your message, and leave a voicemail if they don’t answer.

Write an op-ed or letter to the editor

The Casper Star-Tribune ain’t the New York Times—if you write a thoughtful, well-structured, and engaging story or argument about why public education funding is important, they’ll publish it, and so will your local paper. Again, click here to find your representatives' contact information.

Write a letter or email

These are the easiest things to do, and the least effective, but they’re not meaningless. You have by far the most influence over lawmakers in your own district—write to them unless you have a good reason otherwise. Again, their contact info is with their profile on the Legislature’s website.

Not Sure who your legislators Are?

Click here to find out who your legislator is and their contact information

Who's My Legislator?

Wyoming is a small town. You see your state legislators in restaurants, you know their cousins-in-law, your kids go to junior high together. Take advantage of this accessibility and invite your representative to meet with you and a couple of your like-minded friends. It’s harder for lawmakers to dismiss an argument in person.
Legislative committees meet throughout the state to discuss different topics. These meetings include opportunities for citizens to give public testimony. If you want to talk about education funding, attend a meeting of the Revenue Committee or the Select Committee on School Finance Recalibration. You can find out where and when these committees meet on the Legislature’s website (http://legisweb.state.wy.us) or sign up to receive emails at BetterWyo.org.
Click here to find out your representatives' phone number. Prepare some notes before you call to ensure you clearly deliver your message, and leave a voicemail if they don’t answer.
The Casper Star-Tribune ain’t the New York Times—if you write a thoughtful, well-structured, and engaging story or argument about why public education funding is important, they’ll publish it, and so will your local paper. Again, click here to find your representatives' contact information.
These are the easiest things to do, and the least effective, but they’re not meaningless. You have by far the most influence over lawmakers in your own district—write to them unless you have a good reason otherwise. Again, their contact info is with their profile on the Legislature’s website.
Click here to find out who your legislator is and their contact information
Wyoming is a small town. You see your state legislators in restaurants, you know their cousins-in-law, your kids go to junior high together. Take advantage of this accessibility and invite your representative to meet with you and a couple of your like-minded friends. It’s harder for lawmakers to dismiss an argument in person.
Legislative committees meet throughout the state to discuss different topics. These meetings include opportunities for citizens to give public testimony. If you want to talk about education funding, attend a meeting of the Revenue Committee or the Select Committee on School Finance Recalibration. You can find out where and when these committees meet on the Legislature’s website (http://legisweb.state.wy.us) or sign up to receive emails at BetterWyo.org.
Click here to find out your representatives' phone number. Prepare some notes before you call to ensure you clearly deliver your message, and leave a voicemail if they don’t answer.
The Casper Star-Tribune ain’t the New York Times—if you write a thoughtful, well-structured, and engaging story or argument about why public education funding is important, they’ll publish it, and so will your local paper. Again, click here to find your representatives' contact information.
These are the easiest things to do, and the least effective, but they’re not meaningless. You have by far the most influence over lawmakers in your own district—write to them unless you have a good reason otherwise. Again, their contact info is with their profile on the Legislature’s website.
Click here to find out who your legislator is and their contact information
Wyoming is a small town. You see your state legislators in restaurants, you know their cousins-in-law, your kids go to junior high together. Take advantage of this accessibility and invite your representative to meet with you and a couple of your like-minded friends. It’s harder for lawmakers to dismiss an argument in person.
Legislative committees meet throughout the state to discuss different topics. These meetings include opportunities for citizens to give public testimony. If you want to talk about education funding, attend a meeting of the Revenue Committee or the Select Committee on School Finance Recalibration. You can find out where and when these committees meet on the Legislature’s website (http://legisweb.state.wy.us) or sign up to receive emails at BetterWyo.org.
Click here to find out your representatives' phone number. Prepare some notes before you call to ensure you clearly deliver your message, and leave a voicemail if they don’t answer.
The Casper Star-Tribune ain’t the New York Times—if you write a thoughtful, well-structured, and engaging story or argument about why public education funding is important, they’ll publish it, and so will your local paper. Again, click here to find your representatives' contact information.
These are the easiest things to do, and the least effective, but they’re not meaningless. You have by far the most influence over lawmakers in your own district—write to them unless you have a good reason otherwise. Again, their contact info is with their profile on the Legislature’s website.
Click here to find out who your legislator is and their contact information
Wyoming is a small town. You see your state legislators in restaurants, you know their cousins-in-law, your kids go to junior high together. Take advantage of this accessibility and invite your representative to meet with you and a couple of your like-minded friends. It’s harder for lawmakers to dismiss an argument in person.
Legislative committees meet throughout the state to discuss different topics. These meetings include opportunities for citizens to give public testimony. If you want to talk about education funding, attend a meeting of the Revenue Committee or the Select Committee on School Finance Recalibration. You can find out where and when these committees meet on the Legislature’s website (http://legisweb.state.wy.us) or sign up to receive emails at BetterWyo.org.
Click here to find out your representatives' phone number. Prepare some notes before you call to ensure you clearly deliver your message, and leave a voicemail if they don’t answer.
The Casper Star-Tribune ain’t the New York Times—if you write a thoughtful, well-structured, and engaging story or argument about why public education funding is important, they’ll publish it, and so will your local paper. Again, click here to find your representatives' contact information.
These are the easiest things to do, and the least effective, but they’re not meaningless. You have by far the most influence over lawmakers in your own district—write to them unless you have a good reason otherwise. Again, their contact info is with their profile on the Legislature’s website.
Click here to find out who your legislator is and their contact information
Legislative committees meet throughout the state to discuss different topics. These meetings include opportunities for citizens to give public testimony. If you want to talk about education funding, attend a meeting of the Revenue Committee or the Select Committee on School Finance Recalibration. You can find out where and when these committees meet on the Legislature’s website (http://legisweb.state.wy.us) or sign up to receive emails at BetterWyo.org.
Wyoming is a small town. You see your state legislators in restaurants, you know their cousins-in-law, your kids go to junior high together. Take advantage of this accessibility and invite your representative to meet with you and a couple of your like-minded friends. It’s harder for lawmakers to dismiss an argument in person.
Click here to find out your representatives' phone number. Prepare some notes before you call to ensure you clearly deliver your message, and leave a voicemail if they don’t answer.
The Casper Star-Tribune ain’t the New York Times—if you write a thoughtful, well-structured, and engaging story or argument about why public education funding is important, they’ll publish it, and so will your local paper. Again, click here to find your representatives' contact information.
These are the easiest things to do, and the least effective, but they’re not meaningless. You have by far the most influence over lawmakers in your own district—write to them unless you have a good reason otherwise. Again, their contact info is with their profile on the Legislature’s website.
Click here to find out who your legislator is and their contact information
Wyoming is a small town. You see your state legislators in restaurants, you know their cousins-in-law, your kids go to junior high together. Take advantage of this accessibility and invite your representative to meet with you and a couple of your like-minded friends. It’s harder for lawmakers to dismiss an argument in person.
Legislative committees meet throughout the state to discuss different topics. These meetings include opportunities for citizens to give public testimony. If you want to talk about education funding, attend a meeting of the Revenue Committee or the Select Committee on School Finance Recalibration. You can find out where and when these committees meet on the Legislature’s website (http://legisweb.state.wy.us) or sign up to receive emails at BetterWyo.org.
Click here to find out your representatives' phone number. Prepare some notes before you call to ensure you clearly deliver your message, and leave a voicemail if they don’t answer.
The Casper Star-Tribune ain’t the New York Times—if you write a thoughtful, well-structured, and engaging story or argument about why public education funding is important, they’ll publish it, and so will your local paper. Again, click here to find your representatives' contact information.
These are the easiest things to do, and the least effective, but they’re not meaningless. You have by far the most influence over lawmakers in your own district—write to them unless you have a good reason otherwise. Again, their contact info is with their profile on the Legislature’s website.
Click here to find out who your legislator is and their contact information
Legislative committees meet throughout the state to discuss different topics. These meetings include opportunities for citizens to give public testimony. If you want to talk about education funding, attend a meeting of the Revenue Committee or the Select Committee on School Finance Recalibration. You can find out where and when these committees meet on the Legislature’s website (http://legisweb.state.wy.us) or sign up to receive emails at BetterWyo.org.
Wyoming is a small town. You see your state legislators in restaurants, you know their cousins-in-law, your kids go to junior high together. Take advantage of this accessibility and invite your representative to meet with you and a couple of your like-minded friends. It’s harder for lawmakers to dismiss an argument in person.
Click here to find out your representatives' phone number. Prepare some notes before you call to ensure you clearly deliver your message, and leave a voicemail if they don’t answer.
The Casper Star-Tribune ain’t the New York Times—if you write a thoughtful, well-structured, and engaging story or argument about why public education funding is important, they’ll publish it, and so will your local paper. Again, click here to find your representatives' contact information.
These are the easiest things to do, and the least effective, but they’re not meaningless. You have by far the most influence over lawmakers in your own district—write to them unless you have a good reason otherwise. Again, their contact info is with their profile on the Legislature’s website.
Click here to find out who your legislator is and their contact information